Viewing Room Main Site
Skip to content

We are pleased to present "Twenty Drawings," a selection of works on paper by nine artists spanning the years 1947 to 2007. Exemplifying the possibilities that drawings can afford from the figurative to the abstract and the spaces between, this online exhibition surveys creativity in the medium with the use of ink, pastel, watercolor, pencil, crayon, or oil on paper. This continues the gallery's ongoing interest in drawing that began in 1997 with the exhibition "Drawing a Line and Crossing It."

Swiper

 Louise Bourgeois


Louise Bourgeois

Untitled, 1949

Ink and graphite on paper

22 x 15 inches (55.9 x 38.1 cm)

Inquire
 Louise Bourgeois


Louise Bourgeois

Untitled, 1949

Ink and graphite on paper

22 x 15 inches (55.9 x 38.1 cm)

Inquire
 Louise Bourgeois


Louise Bourgeois

Untitled, 1949

Ink and graphite on paper

22 x 15 inches (55.9 x 38.1 cm)

Inquire

“I know that when I finish a drawing my anxiety level decreases. The realistic drawings are a way of pinning down an idea. I don't want to lose it. With the abstract drawings, when I'm feeling loose, I can slip into the unconscious.”

— Louise Bourgeois

Swiper

 Louise Bourgeois


Louise Bourgeois

Untitled, 1947

Ink on Strathmore drawing paper

14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm)

Inquire
 Louise Bourgeois


Louise Bourgeois
Untitled, 1947
Ink on Strathmore drawing paper
14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm)

Inquire
 Louise Bourgeois


Louise Bourgeois

Untitled, 1947

Ink on Strathmore drawing paper

14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm)

Inquire

"Drawings are thought feathers, they are ideas that I seize in mid-flight and put down on paper.”

— Louise Bourgeois

Swiper

 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Against Time, 1989

Pastel on paper

26 1/4 x 19 inches (66.7 x 48.3 cm)

Inquire
 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Against Time, 1989

Pastel on paper

26 1/4 x 19 inches (66.7 x 48.3 cm)

Inquire
 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Against Time, 1989

Pastel on paper

26 1/4 x 19 inches (66.7 x 48.3 cm)

Inquire

“A photograph to me is always a reminder of how the person was on a certain day in that certain light fixed. When I look at a watercolor of that same person, it seems to me alive, more open than a photograph.”

— Francesco Clemente

Swiper

 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Untitled (from the series CVIII, no B LXXI), 1985

Watercolor on Pondicherry paper

6 3/4 x 10 inches (17.2 x 25.4 cm)

Inquire
 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Untitled (from the series CVIII, no B LXXI), 1985

Watercolor on Pondicherry paper

6 3/4 x 10 inches (17.2 x 25.4 cm)

Inquire
 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Untitled (from the series CVIII, no B LXXI), 1985

Watercolor on Pondicherry paper

6 3/4 x 10 inches (17.2 x 25.4 cm)

Inquire

“I have never thought in terms of abstraction or figuration. I have always thought in terms of fluidity and fracture. My work is born out of a proliferation of designs."

— Francesco Clemente

Swiper

 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Untitled (from the series CVIII, no. BIX), 1985

Watercolor on Pondicherry paper

9 1/4 x 10 inches (23.5 x 25.4 cm)

Inquire
 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Untitled (from the series CVIII, no. BIX), 1985

Watercolor on Pondicherry paper

9 1/4 x 10 inches (23.5 x 25.4 cm)

Inquire
 Francesco Clemente


Francesco Clemente

Untitled (from the series CVIII, no. BIX), 1985

Watercolor on Pondicherry paper

9 1/4 x 10 inches (23.5 x 25.4 cm)

Inquire

“Watercolors are about fluidity and the experience of male versus female is about fluidity. It’s a simple encounter – watercolors, man, woman, and the relentless desire of life to live.”

— Francesco Clemente

Swiper

 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

study from a painting idea, 2, 2007

Watercolor on old India ledger paper

9 3/4 x 12 1/4 inches (24.8 x 31.1 cm)

Inquire
 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

study from a painting idea, 2, 2007

Watercolor on old India ledger paper

9 3/4 x 12 1/4 inches (24.8 x 31.1 cm)

Inquire
 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

study from a painting idea, 2, 2007

Watercolor on old India ledger paper

9 3/4 x 12 1/4 inches (24.8 x 31.1 cm)

Inquire

“Composition works with color, with surface, and with light to create an abstract visual reality that I wish to exist solely on its strength as art….There is no need for the embellishment of ‘story.’”

— Suzan Frecon

Swiper

 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

four reds on orange area, 2007

Watercolor on agate burnished old Indian jute paper

11 x 15 1/4 inches (27.9 x 38.7 cm)

Inquire
 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

four reds on orange area, 2007

Watercolor on agate burnished old Indian jute paper

11 x 15 1/4 inches (27.9 x 38.7 cm)

Inquire
 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

four reds on orange area, 2007

Watercolor on agate burnished old Indian jute paper

11 x 15 1/4 inches (27.9 x 38.7 cm)

Inquire

"I find watercolor works best when I’m more focused on doing something specific with it. I often do watercolors from the large paintings."

— Suzan Frecon

Swiper

 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

observatory, 2006

watercolor on old India ledger paper

9 3/4 x 11 5/8 inches (24.8 x 29.5 cm)

Inquire
 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

observatory, 2006

Watercolor on old India ledger paper

9 3/4 x 11 5/8 inches (24.8 x 29.5 cm)

Inquire
 Suzan Frecon


Suzan Frecon

observatory, 2006

Watercolor on old India ledger paper

9 3/4 x 11 5/8 inches (24.8 x 29.5 cm)

Inquire

“Landscape, architecture, human beings, and their consciousness: it is all there, but it’s not a depiction.”

— Suzan Frecon

Swiper

 Alex Katz


Alex Katz

Suzette, 2007

Charcoal on paper

15 1/4 x 22 1/4 inches (38.7 x 56.5 cm)

Inquire
 Alex Katz


Alex Katz

Suzette, 2007

Charcoal on paper

15 1/4 x 22 1/4 inches (38.7 x 56.5 cm)

Inquire
 Alex Katz


Alex Katz

Suzette, 2007

Charcoal on paper

15 1/4 x 22 1/4 inches (38.7 x 56.5 cm)

Inquire

"A sketch is very direct. It is working empirically, inside of an idea."

— Alex Katz

Swiper

 Alex Katz


Alex Katz

Hydrangea, 2001

Graphite, charcoal, and dry pigment on paper mounted on board

35 7/8 x 49 7/8 inches (91.1 x 126.7 cm)

Inquire
 Alex Katz


Alex Katz

Hydrangea, 2001

Graphite, charcoal, and dry pigment on paper mounted on board

35 7/8 x 49 7/8 inches (91.1 x 126.7 cm)

Inquire
 Alex Katz


Alex Katz

Hydrangea, 2001

Graphite, charcoal, and dry pigment on paper mounted on board

35 7/8 x 49 7/8 inches (91.1 x 126.7 cm)

Inquire

"I spend most of my time drawing. I spend far more time doing that than the larger paintings. It’s about getting the drawing and the logic right. Once you transfer that to the canvas for the painting, what you see is what’s there."

— Alex Katz

Swiper

 Agnes Martin


Agnes Martin

Untitled, ca. 1992-94

Ink, wash and graphite on paper

10 7/8 x 10 7/8 inches (27.6 x 27.6 cm) paper

8 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches (22.2 x 22.2) image

Inquire
Agnes Martin, Untitled, ca. 1992-94

Agnes Martin

Untitled, ca. 1992-94

Ink, wash and graphite on paper

10 7/8 x 10 7/8 inches (27.6 x 27.6 cm) paper

8 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches (22.2 x 22.2) image

Inquire

“When I think of art, I think of beauty. Beauty is the mystery of life. It is in the mind, not in the eye. In our minds, we have an awareness of perfection that leads us on.”

— Agnes Martin

Swiper

 Malcolm Morley


Malcolm Morley

Untitled, 1980

Watercolor

19 1/2 x 25 inches (49.5 x 63.5 cm)

Inquire
 Malcolm Morley


Malcolm Morley

Untitled, 1980

Watercolor

19 1/2 x 25 inches (49.5 x 63.5 cm)

Inquire
 Malcolm Morley


Malcolm Morley

Untitled, 1980

Watercolor

19 1/2 x 25 inches (49.5 x 63.5 cm)

Inquire

“I really started painting watercolors when I was in jail, and I got very adept at it. And then the first time I went to art school, oil paint was introduced. Art was introduced. So, watercolors were shunted to the side. Much later on, I broke away from the photo-realist connection. Once I’d worked that out, I saw the possibilities of, ‘By jove! I’m a very good watercolor painter. Why don’t I make my oil paintings from my own images? I don’t need anybody else’s images now.’”

— Malcolm Morley

Swiper

 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Pencil, colored pencil, crayon, oil crayon, and gesso on paper

10 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches (26 x 23.2 cm)

Inquire
 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Pencil, colored pencil, crayon, oil crayon, and gesso on paper

10 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches (26 x 23.2 cm)

Inquire
 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Pencil, colored pencil, crayon, oil crayon, and gesso on paper

10 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches (26 x 23.2 cm)

Inquire

“The drawings referring to external things were begun in 1967. I had the idea then that sculpture could be looked upon as a species synthetic of other arts (like music or architecture) and nature. I suppose I used this tripartite division partly as a pretext to draw things I wanted to contact.”

— David Rabinowitch

Swiper

 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Gouache, crayon, oil crayon, pencil, and paint on paper

11 7/8 x 8 7/8 inches (30.2 x 22.5 cm)

Inquire
 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Gouache, crayon, oil crayon, pencil, and paint on paper

11 7/8 x 8 7/8 inches (30.2 x 22.5 cm)

Inquire
 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Gouache, crayon, oil crayon, pencil, and paint on paper

11 7/8 x 8 7/8 inches (30.2 x 22.5 cm)

Inquire

“The construction of art determines itself as a beginning. It’s not dependent on sequential narrative content.”

— David Rabinowitch

Swiper

 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Oil crayon, pencil, and paint on paper

12 x 9 inches (30.5 x 22.9 cm)

Inquire
 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Oil crayon, pencil, and paint on paper

12 x 9 inches (30.5 x 22.9 cm)

Inquire
 David Rabinowitch


David Rabinowitch

Untitled (Drawing for the Phantom Group), 1967

Oil crayon, pencil, and paint on paper

12 x 9 inches (30.5 x 22.9 cm)

Inquire

“Each finalized diagram “contains,” imaginatively, a total range of attributes experienced in time, and space. The plans that I preserved are each the culmination of a process.”

— David Rabinowitch

Swiper

 Jan Schoonhoven


Jan Schoonhoven

T 76-25, 1976

Ink on paper

19 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches (49.9 x 32.1 cm)

Inquire
 Jan Schoonhoven


Jan Schoonhoven

T 76-25, 1976

Ink on paper

19 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches (49.9 x 32.1 cm)

Inquire
 Jan Schoonhoven


Jan Schoonhoven

T 76-25, 1976

Ink on paper

19 5/8 x 12 5/8 inches (49.9 x 32.1 cm)

Inquire

“The most important thing in the development of the artistic creation of our century is the growing need for the representation of the essential through pure means. The essential takes shape most clearly in forms which are generally valid, forms which in themselves are possibilities of contemplation for the human soul.”

— Jan Schoonhoven

Swiper

 Jan Schoonhoven


Jan Schoonhoven

T 75-17, 1975

Ink on paper

16 7/8 x 10 5/8 inches (43 x 27 cm)

Inquire
 Jan Schoonhoven


Jan Schoonhoven

T 75-17, 1975

Ink on paper

16 7/8 x 10 5/8 inches (43 x 27 cm)

Inquire
 Jan Schoonhoven


Jan Schoonhoven

T 75-17, 1975

Ink on paper

16 7/8 x 10 5/8 inches (43 x 27 cm)

Inquire

“I want to make it completely intangible. There should no longer be a single thing from tangible reality.”

— Jan Schoonhoven

Swiper

 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Untitled (School of Fish), 1997

Oil pigment on paper

19 3/4 x 27 1/2 inches (50.2 x 69.9 cm)

Inquire
 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Untitled (School of Fish), 1997

Oil pigment on paper

19 3/4 x 27 1/2 inches (50.2 x 69.9 cm)

Inquire
 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Untitled (School of Fish), 1997

Oil pigment on paper

19 3/4 x 27 1/2 inches (50.2 x 69.9 cm)

Inquire

"What I am doing, essentially is subjecting this material to my memory of art, and to my artistic desire. By imposing this new order of experience, I seek to place the known once again into a category of the unexplained.”

— Philip Taaffe

Swiper

Philip Taaffe, Untitled, 1998

Philip Taaffe

Untitled, 1998

Oil pigment on paper

26 1/4 x 40 inches (66.7 x 101.6 cm)

Inquire
 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Untitled, 1998

Oil pigment on paper

26 1/4 x 40 inches (66.7 x 101.6 cm)

Inquire
 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Untitled, 1998

Oil pigment on paper

26 1/4 x 40 inches (66.7 x 101.6 cm)

Inquire

“I love delving into the past, but I am telling a brand-new story. I’m not trying to make some nostalgic thing—I’m trying to shape a future and give the world hope. We need to move forward.”

— Philip Taaffe

Swiper

 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Smaller, Singular Fish (Trachichthys Darwini) III, 1997

Oil pigment on paper

15 x 22 inches (38.1 x 55.9 cm)

Inquire
 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Smaller, Singular Fish (Trachichthys Darwini) III, 1997

Oil pigment on paper

15 x 22 inches (38.1 x 55.9 cm)

Inquire
 Philip Taaffe


Philip Taaffe

Smaller, Singular Fish (Trachichthys Darwini) III, 1997

Oil pigment on paper

15 x 22 inches (38.1 x 55.9 cm)

Inquire

"Decoration in this folk sense is a kind of culturalized representation of nature. I primarily want to feel the living reality of these elements, and to respond to them in a personal way by making a composition that allows these other voices to speak again in a way that I’ve understood and responded to.”

— Philip Taaffe

*All works are subject to availability; all prices are subject to change.
© 2022 Blumarts, Inc.

Back To Top